‘Blog’

Too Late?

Some people love fall. Some struggle with it (I know I do). Days are shorter, colors are fading… and, eventually, the landscape will turn to gray. Yes, Mother Nature enters hibernation mode from the bugs to the grass. But work keeps going… and now… without as much daylight! It’s so common to struggle with this that they’ve given it a name: SAD (seasonal adjustment disorder). The change in seasons, holidays, and anticipation of a “new year” can also surface thoughts about where we are in our lives. Sometimes questioning is it too late to do _________. As well, in an operations business like ours, we are always pushing to be better, stronger, more efficient, more effective. We are challenged to change habits, routines, tools, “to start” doing ________. But, is it too late to try? I saw this meme the other day and it stuck with me. Maybe you’ll like it too.

Leslie Phillips
CEO

The post Too Late? is by Leslie Phillips, Chief Executive Officer and appeared first on Meriwether Godsey.

Brownies with Caramel Sauce

Caramel Sauce Makes 1 Cup

Ingredients

1 box high quality brownie mix
Cook according to package directions

Caramel Sauce

1 c sugar
6 T butter
½ c heavy cream
1 t vanilla extract (optional)

Procedure

1. In heavy bottomed 2-3 quart pan, caramelize sugar on medium high, stir constantly until melted & amber. (Careful gets very hot).
2. Whisk in butter, until melted.
3. Remove from heat & whisk in cream, continue to whisk until smooth.
4. Let cool & then spread on brownies.

Note: can pour into mason jar & refrigerate for other uses.

The post Brownies with Caramel Sauce is by Denise Simmons, Corporate Executive Chef and appeared first on Meriwether Godsey.

Keep Moving

Nobody said it was going to be easy… to get through school, to find that first job, to finish that race, to deal with disappointment, to lose a loved one. It is anything but easy. And, yet, as we experience (or maybe better put, survive) these life events, we are growing: up, older, wiser, and perhaps more at peace with the unending number of things we cannot control. Life and even survival, physically and emotionally, call on us to keep moving.

“One can choose to go back towards safety or forward towards growth. Growth must be chosen again and again; fear must be overcome again and again.” – Abraham Maslow

Leslie Phillips
CEO

The post Keep Moving is by Leslie Phillips, Chief Executive Officer and appeared first on Meriwether Godsey.

Warm Sesame Ginger Eggplant

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 T vegetable oil
1 T sesame oil
1 lg eggplants (about 1 ½ lb), peeled, ¾” strips
1 c onion, medium diced
2 t fresh garlic, minced
2 t fresh ginger, minced or grated
2 t asian garlic chili sauce
2 T fresh lime juice
s&p
green onion & fresh cilantro (garnish)

Procedure

1. Preheat the oven to 375°F
2. Combine vegetable & sesame oils. Toss 4 t with cut eggplant & onion, roast on baking sheet until tender, 10-15 min.
3. Sauté garlic & ginger in remaining 2 t oil. Add chili sauce, lime juice & roasted vegetables, season with s&p.
4. Serve hot with green onion & fresh cilantro garnish.

The post Warm Sesame Ginger Eggplant is by Denise Simmons, Corporate Executive Chef and appeared first on Meriwether Godsey.

Virginia Apple Cake

Makes 1 loaf

Ingredients

1 ½ c vegetable oil
2 c sugar
4 eggs
2 ½ c flour
2 t baking powder
1 t cinnamon
1 t salt
3 c fresh apples, chopped
1 c pecans (optional)
1 t vanilla

Procedure

1. Blend oil & sugar, add eggs, 1 at a time, beating well.
2. Sift dry ingredients together, add to egg mixture.
3. Stir in apples, pecans & vanilla.
4. Pour into greased 10″ loaf pan.
5. Bake at 350F for about an hour.

The post Virginia Apple Cake is by Denise Simmons, Corporate Executive Chef and appeared first on Meriwether Godsey.

Make Room for Fun

Who doesn’t love to hear a guest say, “that was a perfect meal”? But, how many times have you heard that from one guest, only to have another say “that meal was meh.” This happens all the time because food is personal. Some like spicy, some not so much. Some like steak, some not so much. So to preserve our inner peace, we have to lose this idea that we and our food must be perfect. Perfection, like beauty, rests in the eye of the beholder. And, there are some downsides to chasing it:

  • Creating anything without flaw or defect (if it’s even possible) takes more time, doing and redoing. Most people don’t recognize perfection making those redos a waste of valuable energy and resources.
  • It’s a “breeding ground for my way or the highway thinking which is a death knell for diversity of thought, opinion, and perspective.” It reduces playfulness and willingness to take risk. Even worse, it can leave people feeling inferior and unappreciated.
  • It will make you sick: perfectionists are at greater risk for depression, high blood pressure, anxiety.

So let’s do our very best, treat everyone with unrelenting kindness, accept good enough, and rejoice that tomorrow is…another meal!

Leslie Phillips
CEO

The post Make Room for Fun is by Leslie Phillips, Chief Executive Officer and appeared first on Meriwether Godsey.

The Persistence of Diet Culture

As I gear myself to head “back to school” with the local college students, I am reminded of the importance of my work, which includes counseling for students with nutritional issues. A great majority of my clients are students who battle with body image struggles, the majority of which began in childhood.  The lifelong effects of dieting at such young ages have been detrimental to their mental & physical health. When I first began my career as a registered dietitian, I never imagined I would view dieting as a negative. As aspiring dietitians, we were taught that fat is always equivalent to poor health & the final goal was a “healthy” bodyweight, which really was code for thin. Luckily, scientific research & clinical experience has proved us wrong. There are many different body types that are considered healthy & many of those don’t fall under the standards of what society considers “skinny.”  As a responsible clinician I feel it is my duty to educate others about the importance of healthy living that does not involve any form of dieting.  That is why this op-ed was so profound for me.  Christy Harrison I a registered dietitian whose practice focuses on helping clients recover from disordered eating. I strongly encourage you to read these op-eds written by Harrison in response to the release of Kurbo, a kids “dieting” app released by Weight Watchers.

Why you should never give your kids this app

It’s the way we were born eating

Just a few takeaways:

“As a registered dietitian who specializes in helping people recover from disordered eating, I strongly recommend that parents keep this new tool — and any weight-loss program — away from their children.

Our society is unfair and cruel to people who are in larger bodies, so I can empathize with parents who might believe their child needs to lose weight, and with any child who wants to. Unfortunately, attempts to shrink a child’s body are likely to be both ineffective and harmful to physical and mental health.

Over the last 60 years, numerous studies have shown that among people who lose weight, more than 90 percent gain it back over the long run. For example, a 2000 study [CW: weight-stigmatizing language and numbers used] of adults 20 to 45 found that less than 5 percent lost weight and kept it off long term. And a 2015 study [CW] of more than 176,000 higher-weight people age 20 and older found that 95 percent to 98 percent of those who lost weight gained back all of it (or more) within five years. A 2007 review [CW] of the scientific evidence found that most people likely gained back more.”

The post The Persistence of Diet Culture is by Sherri Meyer, Corporate Dietitian and appeared first on Meriwether Godsey.

Citrus, Fennel, & Chickpea Salad

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 large fennel bulb, very thinly sliced
(15 oz) can chickpeas, drained & rinsed
3 celery stalks, very thinly sliced
½ c fresh flat leaf parsley, chopped
4 T fresh lemon juice
4 T olive oil
½ c grated parmesan
s&p

Procedure

1. Toss together fennel, chickpeas, celery, parsley, lemon juice & olive oil.
2. Season with s&p to taste, chill.
3. Before serving sprinkle with grated parmesan.

The post Citrus, Fennel, & Chickpea Salad is by Denise Simmons, Corporate Executive Chef and appeared first on Meriwether Godsey.

Hedgehogs and Such

I’m a big fan of The 5 Chairs (and Louise Evans). The second chair is self-doubt (the hedgehog), and so this article caught my eye:  what to do when you doubt yourself as a leader.  As leaders, we’re all human and we all suffer from self-doubt from time to time. It’s what you do in those situations that matters most. The article offers some tips for managing this common feeling:

Breakdowns can lead to breakthroughs. Sometimes you need to get to a low point to make the adjustments you need to move to the next level in your personal development.

Ride the Wave. Don’t beat yourself up for feeling anxious.  Self-doubt is natural, common, and often a sign of humility. Probe what you’re feeling.  When am I doubtful?  Who am I with when I feel it most? In what situations?

Share with someone you trust. Sharing allows you to process out loud and to hear outside perspective.

If you can’t change a situation, you have to change yourself. Practice focus and discipline in your work and try to do at least one thing every day to fuel your sense of accomplishment. Over time, it will boost your self-confidence.

Leslie Phillips

CEO

The post Hedgehogs and Such is by Leslie Phillips, Chief Executive Officer and appeared first on Meriwether Godsey.

The Best Intentions

An exciting part of our business is that we really are a collection of many businesses — from NC to MA. We have different accents, climates, favorite teams, and yes, food preferences. But, this also means that face time with one another is, regrettably, infrequent. We use other tools to stay in touch: zoom, phone, email-text-slack-chat. All fine, but…these methods increase our risk for miscommunication. Two things are in play:  intent and impact. When delivering and receiving messages we often think these are aligned. The person delivering assumes the other understands their intent. The person receiving assumes the impact of the message (on them) is what was intended. When it comes to any communication that is not in person we lose cues: eye contact, facial expressions, body language. And when we use non-verbal alternatives like email and text, we lose those and more: tone of voice, speech patterns, fluidity found in conversation. So a few things to practice:

  • Share your intent up-front
  • Pause to consider the impact of your messages – look for cues that you may have been misunderstood and talk about it
  • If your impact was not as intended, don’t over-explain your intent, start empathizing. “I can see how my message came across that way.”
  • Remember this: we read emails and texts in a tone of voice, and imagining the other party’s facial expression. These assumptions can be very wrong. Don’t let them carry you away.
  • Alternative tools are great, but….keep your “pick up the phone” radar turned on and listen to it!

Leslie Phillips
CEO

The post The Best Intentions is by Leslie Phillips, Chief Executive Officer and appeared first on Meriwether Godsey.

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